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Install phpMyAdmin on CentOs

while installing phpmyadmin on my local machine using vmware at Centos 5.5.

i faced some problems so thought to share the steps for other to overcome these problems.
1. Update the packages

# yum update -y

2. Install MySQL packages

# yum install mysql-server mysql mysql-devel

3. Make MySQL boot up automatically

# chkconfig mysqld on

4. Start MySQL service

# service mysqld start
# /etc/init.d/mysqld restart

5. Set the password for the root user

# /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation (Recommended)
OR
# mysqladmin -u root password eaziweb

6. Install php and common packages

# yum install php php-gd php-imap php-mysql php-pear php-xml phpxmlrpc curl libxml2 php-mbstring php-mcrypt

7. Install phpMyAdmin
Because the version of php on CentOS 5.5 is 5.1.6, we only can install phpMyAdmin 2.x, I choose 2.11.11.3.

# cd /usr/share
# wget http://sourceforge.net/projects/phpmyadmin/files/phpMyAdmin/2.11.11.3/phpMyAdmin-2.11.11.3-english.tar.gz/download
# tar xvfz phpMyAdmin-2.11.11.3-english.tar.gz
# mv phpMyAdmin-2.11.11.3-english phpmyadmin
# rm phpMyAdmin-2.11.11.3-english.tar.gz
# cd phpmyadmin
# cp config.sample.inc.php config.inc.php

8. Edit the config.inc.php file, find the line that contain “blowfish_secret”, and modify like below.

$cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] = ‘TypeAnything_for_Secure’;

9. Restart the httpd service

# /etc/init.d/httpd restart

10. Enter the URL http://%5BIP Address]/phpMyAdmin/ on Firefox browser, we’ll can see the login web page.

http://localhost/phpMyAdmin

After inputting the root user and its password(eaziweb), we can use phpMyAdmin to manage the MySQL.
Errors
1. 404 Not Found Error
Please make sure you push your phpMyAdmin directory in your webroot. In my case it’s /var/www/html

cp -r phpMyAdmin/ /var/www/html/

2. 403 Forbidden Error
I spend good amount of time finding why access is forbidden and finally did following setting

2.1 Go to /etc/httpd/conf.d/
2.2 vi phpMyAdmin.conf
2.3 Add following lines

Order allow,deny
Options Indexes
Allow from all

Still not able to access, try disabling the SElinux
SElinux is extra security layer in Linux and sometimes it provide conflicts for apache to work

vi /etc/selinux/config

Modify SELINUX=enforcing  to SELINUX=disabled  //Discuss with your senior. Mine is test server.
Restart your machine
hit http://localhost/phpMyAdmin prompt for username/password for mysql login 
Please note all the steps executed via root credentials . You can use su command to login as root and carry the same steps.

basics of Node.js

I am a newbie in this kind of stuff but lately I’ve been hearing a lot about how good NodeJS is. Considering how much I love working with jQuery and Javascript in general, I can’t help but wonder how to decide when to use NodeJS. The web application I have in mind is something like bit.ly – takes some content, archives it.
From all the homework I have been doing in the last few days, I obtained the following information. NodeJS

  • is a command-line tool that can be run as a regular web server and lets one run Javascript programs
  • utilizes the great V8 JS engine
  • is very good when you need to do several things at the same time
  • is event-based so all the wonderful Ajax like stuff can be done on the server side
  • lets us share code between the browser and the backend
  • lets us talk with MySQL

Some of the sources that I have come across are:

Considering that NodeJS can be run almost out-of-the-box on Amazon’s EC2 instances, I am trying to understand what type of problems require NodeJS as opposed to any of the mighty kings out there like php, python and ruby. I understand that it really depends on the expertise one has on a language but my question falls more into the general category of: When to use a particular framework and what type of problems is it particularly suited for?

linux commands for every web developer/Software engineer

scp – Linux command line tool to copy files over ssh

scp [[user@]from-host:]source-file [[user@]to-host:][destination-file]

scp  abc.TXT root@10.215.3.150:/home/user/xyz.TXT


from-host
Is the name or IP of the host where the source file is, this can be omitted if the from-host is the host where you are actually issuing the command
user
Is the user which have the right to access the file and directory that is supposed to be copied in the cas of the from-host and the user who has the rights to write in the to-host
source-file
Is the file or files that are going to be copied to the destination host, it can be a directory but in that case you need to specify the -r option to copy the contents of the directory
destination-file
Is the name that the copied file is going to take in the to-host, if none is given all copied files are going to maintain its names

Copy Multiple fies

scp root@192.168.168.052:/home/ftp-124/5656/$dir/\{abc.txt,def.txt,ghi.txt\} root@192.168.168.053:/home/shahzeb

Restart MySql Ubuntu

To restart Apache2 on Ubuntu, we enter the following command in a terminal such as bash:

restart mysql

service mysql start


Restart Apache2 Ubuntu

To restart Apache2 on Ubuntu, we enter the following command in a terminal such as bash:

/etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Of course, you most likely will need to be the superuser to do that so you might need to enter the following command and then your password when requested:

sudo /etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Pointer

use pointer to acees the variable within a variable directly like

 foo=bar
 name=foo
 echo ${!name}
Result : bar

grep command: 

grep command usually interpet “|” as “AND” sign but you can use the same “|” for “OR” sign

for example

zgrep “^2012-06-05” /var/path/to/file/abc12346-12-06* | grep -E ‘3003300356|3003301763|3008203898|3008202542|3008226266|3003404159’

zgrep = grep for gzipped files

Installing Apache2 With PHP5 And MySQL On Ubuntu 10.10 (LAMP)

LAMP is short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP. This tutorial shows how you can install an Apache2 webserver on an Ubuntu 10.10 server with PHP5 support (mod_php) and MySQL support.

1 Preliminary Note

In this tutorial I use the hostname server1.example.com with the IP address 192.168.0.100. These settings might differ for you, so you have to replace them where appropriate.I’m running all the steps in this tutorial with root privileges, so make sure you’re logged in as root:

sudo su

2 Installing MySQL 5

First we install MySQL 5 like this:

aptitude install mysql-server mysql-client

You will be asked to provide a password for the MySQL root user – this password is valid for the user root@localhost as well as root@server1.example.com, so we don’t have to specify a MySQL root password manually later on:

New password for the MySQL “root” user: <– yourrootsqlpassword
Repeat password for the MySQL “root” user: <– yourrootsqlpassword

3 Installing Apache2

Apache2 is available as an Ubuntu package, therefore we can install it like this:

aptitude install apache2

Now direct your browser to http://192.168.0.100, and you should see the Apache2 placeholder page (It works!):
Apache’s default document root is /var/www on Ubuntu, and the configuration file is /etc/apache2/apache2.conf. Additional configurations are stored in subdirectories of the /etc/apache2 directory such as /etc/apache2/mods-enabled (for Apache modules), /etc/apache2/sites-enabled (for virtual hosts), and /etc/apache2/conf.d.

4 Installing PHP5

We can install PHP5 and the Apache PHP5 module as follows:

aptitude install php5 libapache2-mod-php5

We must restart Apache afterwards:

/etc/init.d/apache2 restart

5 Testing PHP5 / Getting Details About Your PHP5 Installation

The document root of the default web site is /var/www. We will now create a small PHP file (info.php) in that directory and call it in a browser. The file will display lots of useful details about our PHP installation, such as the installed PHP version.

vi /var/www/info.php
<?php phpinfo(); ?>

Now we call that file in a browser (e.g. http://192.168.0.100/info.php):
As you see, PHP5 is working, and it’s working through the Apache 2.0 Handler, as shown in the Server API line. If you scroll further down, you will see all modules that are already enabled in PHP5. MySQL is not listed there which means we don’t have MySQL support in PHP5 yet.

6 Getting MySQL Support In PHP5

To get MySQL support in PHP, we can install the php5-mysql package. It’s a good idea to install some other PHP5 modules as well as you might need them for your applications. You can search for available PHP5 modules like this:

aptitude search php5

Pick the ones you need and install them like this:

aptitude install php5-mysql php5-curl php5-gd php5-idn php-pear php5-imagick php5-imap php5-mcrypt php5-memcache php5-mhash php5-ming php5-ps php5-pspell php5-recode php5-snmp php5-sqlite php5-tidy php5-xmlrpc php5-xsl php5-json

Now restart Apache2:

/etc/init.d/apache2 restart

Now reload http://192.168.0.100/info.php in your browser and scroll down to the modules section again. You should now find lots of new modules there, including the MySQL module:

7 phpMyAdmin

phpMyAdmin is a web interface through which you can manage your MySQL databases. It’s a good idea to install it:

aptitude install phpmyadmin

You will see the following questions:
Web server to reconfigure automatically: <– apache2
Configure database for phpmyadmin with dbconfig-common? <– No
Afterwards, you can access phpMyAdmin under http://192.168.0.100/phpmyadmin/:

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